The University of Iowa
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
The Department of Biology

Welcome to Biology!

Weiner Lab - Section through the brain of a mouse expressing a green fluorescent protein transgene in selected neurons.
The Department of Biology investigates a wide range of research questions across the vast disciplines of the biological sciences. Our interdisciplinary faculty have research interests in areas ranging from single cells to entire systems and questions ranging from why we need sex to the origin of diseases at the cellular level. We invite you to explore our website to learn more about our outstanding faculty and their research.

As a research department in an academic institution the teaching of future scientists is, and has always been one of our priorities. Our graduate research program trains scientists for careers in academia, industry and government. Our undergraduate students gain a firm foundation in modern biological sciences to prepare them for a multitude of careers that depend on a solid understanding of biology. All students have an opportunity to participate in research areas through our graduate and undergraduate programs. Welcome to Biology!
Weiner Lab - Section through the brain of a mouse expressing a green fluorescent protein transgene in selected neurons. Weiner Lab - Mouse choroid plexus, stained for gamma-protocadherins (green), tight junctions (red) and blood vessels (blue), imaged using whole-mount confocal microscopy. Forbes Lab - Parasitoid wasp in genus Pteromalus. Forbes Lab - Crab spider eating an Apple Maggot larva. Forbes Lab - Parasitoid wasp Macroneura vesicularis. Stipp Lab - Disorganized cell-cell junctions in breast carcinoma cells. Dailey Lab - GFP+ Microglia & YFP+ Neurons in P12 mouse hippocampus. Dailey Lab - GFP+ Microglia & YFP+ Neurons in P12 mouse neocortex. McAllister Lab - All female brood of Drosophila borealis infected with male-killing Wolbachia. Fritzsch Lab - 3D reconstruction of the wildtype and Pax2-cre::Atoh1f/f conditional null mouse to reveal the loss of the organ of Corti (red), similar length of basilar membrane (yellow) and loss of spiral ganglion neurons (orange). Fritzsch Lab - Afferent fiber labeling (red) and PLP-EGFP (green) in a wildtype (left) and ErbB2 null mutant (right). Phillips Lab - Stem cell polarity and asymmetric cell division is flipped in Axin mutant cells (bottom) compared to wild-type (top). Slusarski Lab - Zebrafish with EGFP expressed in cranial facial cartilage. Slusarski Lab - Section of adult zebrafish heart demonstrating wnt5 expression. Neiman Lab - Asexual female Potamopyrgus antipodarum used to study why sex is so common. Image provided by Bart Zijlstra. Neiman Lab - Collecting members of our snail study system from a New Zealand lake. Neiman Lab - Asexual female Potamopyrgus antipodarum used to study why sex is so common. Image provided by Bart Zijlstra. Hendrix Lab - Svastra spp. gathering pollen from Ratibida pinnata. Hendrix Lab - Halicitid bee gathering pollen on cactus. Cheng Lab - A cordate gametophyte generated directly from a sporophyte leaf bypassing meiosis.
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The Department of Biology investigates a wide range of research questions across the vast disciplines of the biological sciences. Our interdisciplinary faculty have research interests in areas ranging from single cells to entire systems and questions ranging from why we need sex to the origin of diseases at the cellular level. We invite you to explore our website to learn more about our outstanding faculty and their research.

As a research department in an academic institution the teaching of future scientists is, and has always been one of our priorities. Our graduate research program trains scientists for careers in academia, industry and government. Our undergraduate students gain a firm foundation in modern biological sciences to prepare them for a multitude of careers that depend on a solid understanding of biology. All students have an opportunity to participate in research areas through our graduate and undergraduate programs. Welcome to Biology!

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Latest News

October 7, 2014
Treating cancer: UI Biology Researchers find gene that could stop tumors in their tracks

The dirt in your backyard may hold the key to isolating cancerous tumors and to potential new treatments for a host of cancers.

University of Iowa researchers have found a gene in a soil-dwelling amoeba that functions similarly to the main tumor-fighting gene found in humans, called PTEN.

When healthy, PTEN suppresses tumor growth in humans. But the gene is prone to mutate, allowing cancerous cells to multiply and form tumors. PTEN mutations are believed to be involved in 40 percent of breast cancer cases, up to 70 percent of prostate cancer cases, and nearly half of all leukemia cases, according to a review of the literature by the UI researchers. Combined, more than 465,000 new cases of breast and prostate cancer have been documented in 2014, according to data from the American Cancer Society

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Biology Seminars
Upcoming seminars from the Biology Department
  • October 23, 2014 - 12:30 PM
  • Room 106 BBE
  • Hendrik Poinar
  • McMaster University
  • "Using ancient DNA to study the evolution of pathogens"
  • October 24, 2014 - 4:00 PM
  • Kollros Auditorium, 101 Biology Building East
  • Dr. Michael Dickinson
  • University of Washington
  • Death Valley, Drosophila, and the Devonian Toolkit
  • October 27, 2014 - 4:00 PM
  • Kollros Auditorium, Rm 101 BBE
  • Koon Yee Lam and Ben Alleva
  • University of Iowa
  • Dept of Biology Presents Graduate Students: Koon Yee (Arielle) Lam and Ben Alleva
  • More Biology Seminars...
  • Click here to join the BIOLOGY Seminar email list!

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